Recent Articles
Jul
17

The Case Against Flash Cards

The Case Against Flash Cards

As the director of a Montessori school, one of the most frequent questions I get from parents is, “What should I be doing at home to help my child academically?” My answer is always the same: “Talk and read with your child.”

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Jul
17

Behind the Laundry Hamper

Behind the Laundry Hamper

He was a sweet child with an angelic face, this new six year-old from another Montessori school. And he was so eager to please. How was I to know that he—during the very first week of school–would treat the parents at departure to the most spectacular display of temper I’d ever seen, complete with language I’d never in my life heard used against me, by anyone, much less a sweet child!

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Mar
19

Montessori and Attachment Parenting

Montessori and Attachment Parenting

Since my first son’s birth 3 years ago, I have gravitated towards Attachment Parenting. Yet, I have started to question: is it compatible with Montessori?

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Mar
19

You Did It! Praise in the Montessori Classroom.

You Did It!  Praise in the Montessori Classroom.

The only expression that we’ve found to be adequate enough to address this complex issue, is the phrase, “You did it!” It seems to say everything.

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Mar
19

Creativity and Montessori Education

Creativity and Montessori Education

I like to think that maybe she found the experience inspiring nonetheless, and that perhaps the Montessori children had taught her just a little bit more about creativity…

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Mar
19

Connecting the Dots

Connecting the Dots

And so, Peter spends his days in his Montessori classroom engaged in work that he finds fascinating, challenging, and deeply satisfying. In his mind, a vision of the world is taking shape – a world of tightly woven relationships. He begins to understand cause and effect at a universal level. Above all, Peter’s experiences will help him appreciate the achievements of past generations and realize that he, too, can make positive contributions to the world.

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Feb
12

The Silent Journey & Discovery – A Photo Essay

The Silent Journey & Discovery – A Photo Essay

The Silent Journey & Discovery is a powerful event for many parents. Unfortunately, most parents did not attend a Montessori school as a child; although they can read about Montessori philosophy, attend parent nights and observe the classroom, it can be difficult, at times, for them to really understand the experience that their child has every day at school. The J&D provides and opportunity for parents to explore the entire continuum of the school and experience first hand, just like their children, the amazing things that an authentic Montessori program has to offer.

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Feb
12

Learning to Share

Learning to Share

Hang out in any typical environment with numerous children under three and you will hear the common phrase, “Mine!” as one young child grabs a toy from another’s hands. This is generally followed with the common response, “Johnny, no grabbing. You need to SHARE.” Yet, what is the best way for a child to learn how to share?

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Feb
12

Apples vs. Oranges

Apples vs. Oranges

Montessori teachers and school administrators often hear versions of the following questions from parents who are wondering how well their children are being academically prepared in Montessori programs: How does the Montessori curriculum compare to traditional curricula? Are Montessori elementary programs usually academically “accelerated” in relation to their traditional counterparts? How do Montessori graduates compare to other students?

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Jan
9

Keeping It Real – Part II

Keeping It Real – Part II

The definition of fantasy is: “ideas that have no basis in reality”. Fantasy can be a great tool for escape and entertainment for those of us who have a strong grip on reality. However, young children (before the age of 5 or 6) are not able to differentiate between fantasy and reality; a phenomenon that has dire repercussions on their ability to learn and problem-solve.

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Jan
9

Putting Children First

Putting Children First

Every child needs order and routine in their lives, and providing such may be the biggest challenge that we face as parents. With the distractions and demands of both professional and social life, it is easy for us to be distracted and to forget the basic requirement of parenting—giving your undivided attention to your child and to family activity. Your attention provides the order and expectation your child needs to feel secure.

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Jan
9

Everyone Should Learn Math the Montessori Way

Everyone Should Learn Math the Montessori Way

As a student, I started doing math on paper with a pencil; in Montessori the abstract process of math is the final step of a long series of exercises. To me, and most traditional school students, numbers on the page are just that – symbols we are taught how to manipulate. To Montessori students, those symbols represent very concrete ideas that they have physically manipulated; they fully understand what they mean, how they work, and why.

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Dec
13

Keeping It Real – Part I

Keeping It Real – Part I

We are all aware that creativity stems from a well-developed imagination. You have to imagine something before you can create it, right? We also rightly assume that the capacity to imagine is formed in early childhood (a time when children are read fantasy stories and are encouraged to participate in pretend-play). And yet, you won’t find a single fairy tale, doll, or talking animal in a Montessori classroom!

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Dec
13

Meaningful Holidays

Meaningful Holidays

Focus on developing your family’s own holiday traditions, the ones that arise from your own childhood and your family’s culture and religion, and give your children that most precious gift of all, the gift of your undivided attention and time, of a shared experience of meaning and texture.

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Dec
12

Adding to Octodecillions (59 digits)

Adding to Octodecillions (59 digits)

Dr. Montessori observed that children are already motivated to learn. We don’t need to impose motivation on them. In fact, if we give them a little encouragement, they’ll do far more than we would dare ask.

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